From Thomas Bock to Thomas Nevin: Supreme Court prisoner portraits

Police artists worked in the Supreme Court of Tasmania from as early as 1824. An album of portraits of “prisoners taken in the dock” (Dunbar, QVMAG catalogue 1991:25) by Thomas Bock, the father of photographer Thomas Nevin’s close associate Alfred Bock, was on sale at the Sydney booksellers Angus and Robertson in 1910 when collector William Dixson bought it and bequeathed it eventually to the State Library of New South Wales. Alfred Bock also worked on commission as a police artist, producing sketches of prisoners in the dock. The earliest photographs to survive of prisoners taken at the Supreme Court and adjoining Hobart Gaol which were produced by Thomas J. Nevin date from his first contract issued in February 1872. … More From Thomas Bock to Thomas Nevin: Supreme Court prisoner portraits

The Supreme Court mugshots taken by T. J. Nevin from 1871 onwards

Who were they? They were T.J. Nevin’s sitters for police records, mostly “Supreme Court men” photographed on committal for trial at the Supreme Court adjoining the Hobart Gaol when they were isolated in silence for a month after sentencing. If sentenced for a long term at the Supreme Court Launceston, they were photographed, bathed, shaved and dressed on being received in Hobart. These procedures, past and present, were reported at length by a visitor to the Hobart Gaol and Supreme Court in The Mercury, 8th July 1882 … … More The Supreme Court mugshots taken by T. J. Nevin from 1871 onwards

The Photographer’s wife at the studio

T.  J. NEVIN’S STUDIO, 140 Elizabeth St. Hobart PHOTOCHEMICALS & tutorials ELIZABETH RACHEL NEVIN portraits “Look for a long time at what pleases you and longer still at what pains you.” Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette (1873-1954) Photographed from her husband Thomas J. Nevin’s original. Carte-de-visite of Elizabeth Rachel Day, ca. 1870-71. Married on July 12, 1871 to … More The Photographer’s wife at the studio