Alfred Hope and his landau with Albert Nevin early 1900s

HORSE-DRAWN CABS Hobart, Tasmania 1900s-1940s
HOPE, Alfred and NEVIN, Albert, neighbours at Newdegate St. North Hobart, Tasmania
MANSLAUGHTER CHARGE for performing an ABORTION Nurse Woolley 1940

Subject: Seven well-dressed men sitting in William or Alfred Hope’s landau, man standing with a bicycle at rear.
Albert Nevin (1888-1955) son of Thomas and Elizabeth, on horseback behind.
Location and Date: Hobart, Tasmania ca. 1903-1915
Details: sepia photograph, unattributed, recto is torn and cracked, verso shows water-damage, poor condition.
Copyright © KLW NFC Imprint & KLW NFC Group Private Collection

Verso inscription: “HOPES CARRIAGE WITH MY DAD ON HORSE BEHIND”.
Subject: Seven well-dressed men sitting in William or Alfred Hope’s landau, man standing with a bicycle at rear.
Albert Nevin (1888-1955) son of Thomas and Elizabeth, on horseback behind.
Location and Date: Hobart, Tasmania ca. 1903-1915
Details: sepia photograph, unattirbuted, recto is torn and cracked, verso shows water-damage, poor condition.
Copyright © KLW NFC Imprint & KLW NFC Group Private Collection
This photograph may have been published as an insert in the Tasmanian Weekly Courier

This tattered – and therefore much loved – photograph was found among the family memorabilia of Albert Edward Nevin (1888-1955), the youngest child born to photographer Thomas J. Nevin and Elizabeth Rachel Nevin nee Day in 1888 at 236 Elizabeth St. Hobart. One of Albert’s children – a grandchild of Thomas and Elizabeth Nevin – wrote the inscription on the verso in capital letters: “HOPES CARRIAGE WITH MY DAD ON HORSE BEHIND” – identifying the man on horseback behind the carriage as Albert Nevin.

As to the identities of the rest of the group in this photograph, including the identity of the photographer, all is open to speculation. The more senior man seated centre may have been William Hope, owner of the carriage; the younger driver holding the reins his son Alfred Hope who took over his fathers’s horse-drawn cab business in 1913. As a group dressed for a semi-formal occasion in the fashions of the Edwardian period (1890s -1920), their destination might have been the Northall Park race course at Moonah or the Risdon Park race course in Bell Street, New Town, which would explain why Albert Nevin was on horseback accompanying the group. He trained pacers and rode several horses at both tracks: on Saturday 20th February, 1915, at Northall Park, for example, Albert Nevin the rider was reported to make a splendid recovery in the saddle when his mount Dinah Rose’s “gear went wrong” during the second round of the February Cup. On Monday, 10th April 1917,the Mercury reported he had placed second at Risdon Park on “Blue Gum” in Saturday’s Novice Handicap. On Saturday, 11th August 1917, at Northall Park again, he placed third on “Rosalind” in the Derwent Handicap; and back at Risdon Park on January 18th, 1919, he placed third in the Jeannette Handicap on “Hurlston”. And there were many more. His sons Donald, William and Peter took up the reins in the 1940s while Albert and his wife Emily Davis were still at Newdegate St.

By 1923, with the death of their father, photographer Thomas J. Nevin who had been a widower since the death of their mother Elizabeth Rachel Day in 1914, Albert and his three siblings – May, George and William – had moved into the property at 23-29 Queen Street, North Hobart with its two houses, vegetable gardens and stables. Their other two siblings – Minnie Drew nee Nevin and Tom “Sonny” Nevin – were both married and living elsewhere by 1907. Each of the four remaining adult siblings set up a business on the Newdegate St. property and remained there until May and Albert both died in 1955: May did dressmaking; George sold vegetables from the garden; William ran a furniture removal business, and Albert trained a stable of pacers. William died prematurely in a cart accident in 1927. Queen Street was formerly known as Providence Valley, part of the Shoobridge estate. It was called Queen Street by the time Alfred Hope was born there at 28-30 Queen Street in 1897 to William and Frances Hope nee Stops. In 1925 Queen Street was renamed Newdegate Street after Governor Sir Francis Newdegate (1917-1920) to avoid duplication with Queen Street, Sandy Bay.

The property occupied by Albert Nevin and his three siblings at 23-29 Newdegate St., and the family property of William and Alfred Hope at 28-30 Newdegate St. North Hobart directly faced each other. The Providence Valley creek ran through the back of the Nevin stables and under the road, through to the other side into the Hope family property, providing an ideal watering source for their horses. This MDB Map No. 59 shows the drainage through both properties, and the extent of the yards large enough to maintain stables.

Metropolitan Drainage Board Map. No. 58 ca. 1908
The property 23-29 Newdegate St. formerly Queen St. North Hobart where Thomas and Elizabeth Nevin’s adult children settled from c 1923 to the late 1950s.
Albert Nevin kept stables and trained pacers from the property.
The property 28-30 Newdegate St. formerly Queen St. North Hobart where Alfred Hope was born to parents William and Frances Hope in 1897.
William Hope ran a horse-drawn cab business from the property opposite.
Queen St. North Hobart was renamed Newdegate St. after Governor of Tasmania Francis Newdegate (1917-1920).
Source: Archives Office of Tasmania Ref: 628270

On left: Alfred and William Hope’s family residence 28-30 Newdegate St. 1900s
On right: Albert Nevin’s family residence 23-29 Newdegate St. 1923- 1955
Google Maps 2019

Cabs in Hobart: Tom Broughton’s horse-drawn cabs
This photograph of Tom Broughton in the driver’s seat of his landau, was taken in May 1929. A decade on, he had replaced his horse-drawn cabs with a fleet of motor taxis.

NB: horizontally flipped to reveal name and date on glass negative: “Tom Broughton May 1929 (299)”
Subject: Tom Broughton and cab, Elizabeth Street, Hobart, Howard Hotel, corner of Morrison Street on right.
Photographer: ? M. Sharland, Box 4 Item Number NS4023/1/78
Archives Office Tasmania
View online: https://stors.tas.gov.au/NS4023-1-78

The two types of cabs continued to serve the population of Hobart into the 1940s. This photograph taken early 1930s shows the parking arrangement reached by horse-drawn cab drivers and motor car owners at Franklin Square, Hobart.

Above view of ranks of horse drawn cabs and motors in Franklin Square
Item Number: PH30/1/1639
Source:Archives Office of Tasmania
View online: https://stors.tas.gov.au/PH30-1-1639

Alfred Hope, last of the Cabby drivers
Alfred Hope died suddenly, just 46 years old in 1943. He was still operating his horse-drawn cab service up to the time of his death. His home residence with his wife and daughters was at No. 11 Jordan Hill Road, not more than five minutes’ walk from his parents’ family home round the corner at No’s 28-30 Newdegate St. North Hobart.

Alfred Hope and landau outside St David’s Park, Hobart, mid 1920s
Postcard by D. I. C Photo, 173 Elizabeth St. Hobart
Photographer: William Fellowes fl 1923-1926
Source: Aussie Mobs at Flickr
Link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/hwmobs/39545555092

Verso: Alfred Hope and landau outside St David’s Park, Hobart, mid 1920s
Postcard by D. I. C Photo, 173 Elizabeth St. Hobart
Photographer: William Fellowes fl. 1923-1926 at Elizabeth St.

Death of Hobart’s Last Cabby, Alfred Hope.
Source: Examiner (Launceston, Tas. : 1900 – 1954) Mon 12 Apr 1943 Page 4 Death of Hobart’s Last Cabby

TRANSCRIPT

Death of Hobart’s Last Cabby
Mr. Alfred Hope, whose landau was the sole survivor of Hobart’s once large fleet of horse-drawn cabs, died at Hobart last Thursday. Since 1938, when Broughtons replaced their cabs with motor taxis, Mr. Hope had held an unrivalled position on the old cab rank outside Franklin Square. He was well-known to most citizens, and was the delight of many tourists enjoying the novelty of riding in what had become practically a “ghost” cab.
Mr Hope’s cab, which he had driven for 30 years, was previously driven by his father. He was the only son of Mr. William Hope, 28 Newdegate-street, Hobart, and the late Mrs. Hope. He leaves a wife and two daughters.

Source: Examiner (Launceston, Tas. : 1900 – 1954) Mon 12 Apr 1943 Page 4 Death of Hobart’s Last Cabby

Given the style of his clothes, the date of this photograph of Alfred Hope taken in his landau is probably late 1930s, early 1940s, not long before his death.

Side view of landau (Alf Hope, driver), Hobart with Mt. Wellington partial view in background,
Item Number: PH30/1/1673
Start Date: 01 Jan 1920
Source: Archives Office of Tasmania
View online: https://stors.tas.gov.au/AI/PH30-1-1673

Cab driver Alfred Hope and the death of Mrs Daphne Roberts
As cab drivers everywhere and in all eras who have to contend with passengers facing life-threatening circumstances, cab driver Alfred Hope was no exception. On June 6th, 1940, he was summoned by a woman called Jennie Shaw but known as Nurse Woolley at her maternity hospital, 39 Burnett St., North Hobart to drive down to lower Sandy Bay to see her “patient” Daphne Faith Roberts on whom she had performed an abortion the previous day. Daphne Roberts’ husband had telephoned Nurse Woolley as a matter of urgency. His wife was practically delirious when Nurse Woolley arrived at the house. Twenty minutes later, the three of them then proceeded in Alf Hope’s horse-drawn cab to the hospital, though one wonders why they were using a horse and cab, hardly the fastest means of transport in 1940. But even before arriving at the hospital, Nurse Woolley stopped Alf Hope and alighted in Davey St. with the excuse of saving the husband extra expense, leaving Alf Hope to convey post haste a delirious woman near death and her distraught husband to hospital. Daphne Roberts died six hours after admission. Jennie Shaw, aka Nurse Woolley, was charged with her manslaughter. It was not the first time Jennie Shaw or Jennie Woolley had faced manslaughter charges. In 1924 she was charged with the murder of 23 year old Mary Gilligan. The Crown alleged Jennie Woolley had performed an illegal operation; the jury, however, after just 10 minutes’ deliberation, returned a verdict of not guilty, and the accused Nurse Woolley was discharged (Daily Telegraph, Launceston, 10 July 1924 page 5 Murder Charge Fails).

Colonial Hospital, Liverpool Street, main entrance.
Author/Creator: Beattie, J. W. (John Watt), 1859-1930, (not original photographer)
Publication: [Hobart] : J. W. Beattie, [between 1875 and 1885]
Printed on verso: Prepared by J.W. Beattie Hobart, Tasmania
Link: https://stors.tas.gov.au/AUTAS001125298703W800

NEWSPAPER REPORTS

WOMAN’S DEATH
Inquest Opened At Hobart

An Inquest was opened, by the Coroner (Col. J. P. Clark) at Hobart yesterday on the death of Daphne Faith Roberts, a married woman, of Main Rd., Lower Sandy Bay. Mrs. Roberts on June 6 was admitted to the Royal Hobart Hospital, where she collapsed and died six hours later.
Detective-Inspector Fleming represented the police. Mr. N. E. McKenna (Ogilvie, McKenna, and Co.) appeared for Jennie Shaw, otherwise known as Nurse Woolley, a witness at the Inquest, Dr. J. N. Chalmers, deputy superintendent at the Royal Hobart Hospital, said death was caused by septicaemia.
Dr. Campbell Duncan, Government Pathologist, said a post-mortem indicated that abortion had taken place. This might or might not have been self-induced, and it was not possible to say whether instruments had been used.
Ronald Joseph Roberts, husband of the deceased, said that since their marriage in 1935 three children had been born. A month ago his wife found herself pregnant, and spoke of going to see a nurse. Witness opposed such a thing. On June 5 she said she had arranged to go to Nurse Woolley. He told her he did not want her to go, but said that she could it she insisted.
On his return from work that night she said she had been to a nurse and felt all right. By early morning, however, she was in pain, and at noon was delirious. He telephoned Nurse Woolley, and asked her to go to the house. She arrived within an hour, and was in his wife’s bedroom 20 minutes.
She told him to take his wife to a taxicab, as she should be taken to the Royal Hobart Hospital. He did so, and the three of them drove in that direction. On the way, Nurse Woolley, before stopping the cab and getting out, handed him £2/10/. She told him her reason for doing so was that he would be under extra expense. He went on with his wife to the hospital.
On the day after her death he told Nurse Woolley, what had happened. Exclaiming “Good Heavens!” she advised him that if he were asked if anything had been done to his wife it would be best for him to say that he knew nothing about it.
Alfred George Hope, cab driver, said that on June 6 he drove Nurse Woolley from her home in Burnett St. to Roberts’ place, and was paid by the nurse for driving the deceased and her husband to the hospital.
Lily Roberts, mother of the deceased, said that her daughter told her that, accompanied by her husband’s mother, she had been, for an operation, to Nurse Woolley. When, afterwards, she became ill, Nurse Woolley advised that she should be taken to the Royal Hobart Hospital, because there no questions would be asked.
The Inquest was adjourned until this afternoon.

Source: Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), Friday 21 June 1940, page 5

MANSLAUGHTER CHARGE
Nurse for Trial

HOBART, Monday.-Jennie Shaw, who, it was stated in evidence, was known as Nurse Woolley, was to-day committed by the coroner (Col. J. P. Clark) to stand her trial at the Supreme Court on a charge of having unlawfully killed Daphne Faith Roberts. The coroner’s order followed his finding at the inquest on Daphne Faith Roberts, married, of Main-road, Lower Sandy Bay, who died six hours after her admission to the Royal Hobart Hospital on June 6. Death was due to abortion and septicaemia, according to medical evidence. The coroner said he found that a prima facie case had been made out against Jennie Shaw, and he proposed in the circumstances to take the more lenient view in coming to the conclusion that Jennie Shaw had unlawfully killed Daphne Faith Roberts. Shaw, who was represented by Mr. N. E. McKenna, was allowed bail in two sureties of £100.

Source: Examiner (Launceston, Tas. : 1900 – 1954), Tuesday 25 June 1940, page 4

Nurse Woolley accused of death of Daphne Roberts
The Mercury Thu 15 Aug 1940 Page 12 MANSLAUGHTER CHARGE

MANSLAUGHTER CHARGE
Nurse On Trial Following Death Of Woman

THE trial of Jennie Shaw, otherwise known as Nurse Woolley, on a charge of having unlawfully killed Daphne Faith Roberts, married, of Main Rd., Lower Sandy Bay, on June 5, began before Mr. Justice Hutchins in the Criminal Court at Hobart yesterday. The case for the Crown had not been concluded when the Court adjourned until to-day.
Mr. H. J. Solomon (Tinning Propsting Masters, and Solomon) with Mr. J. B. Hutchins appeared for the Crown Mr. N. E. McKenna (Ogilvie, McKenna and Co ) appeared for Nurse Woolley. The following jury was empanelled R. L. Dit-cham (foreman), T. J. Casey L. T. Contencin J Hobden, F. J. Garvín, E L Valentine, T R Gayton, E. J Williams H. W. J. Woolley H. F. Braybon C. A. Fleming, and H. H. Newman
Mr. Solomon said the Crown alleged that the death of Mrs Roberts was the result of an illegal operation, and that the operation had been performed by Nurse Woolley. Mrs. Roberts was a young woman who had been married for some years Her husband was Ronald Joseph Roberts, a gardener and musician. This year Mrs Roberts became pregnant.
On June 5, Mrs. Roberts appeared to her husband to be in normal health at tea time. When he came home in the small hours of the following morning his wife appeared to be in pain.
Early in the afternoon on June 6 Roberts found his wife to be seriously ill, and he rang a telephone number. Roberts would say that a woman who arrived in a cab shortly afterwards was Nurse Woolley. They took Mrs. Roberts to the Royal Hobart Hospital in the cab, but Nurse Woolley left the cab before it reached the hospital.
After admission to hospital, Mr. Solomon continued, Mrs. Roberts was found to have septicaemia and she died that night.
Dr. C. Duncan, Government pathologist, said a post-mortem examination indicated that an abortion had taken place. If the abortion had been induced there might or might not have been signs of it, depending on the method adopted. The presence of the infection suggested that there had been some interference.
Dr. J. S. Chalmers deputy superintendent of the Royal Hobart Hospital, also gave evidence.
Alfred George Hope, cab driver said that on June 6 he drove Nurse Woolley to the Roberts’ home, and took Mrs. Roberts and her husband to the hospital.
Ronald Joseph Roberts, husband of the dead woman, said that when they were taking his wife to hospital Nurse Woolley gave him £2/10/. On the day after his wife’s death, he told her he had to see the doctor at the hospital, and he asked her what was the best thing he could do “She said, “Well, if you don’t know anything, you cannot say anything,” or words to that effect,” Roberts said.
To His Honor: Roberts said he had not received a bill from Nurse Woolley for having visited his home.
His Honor: Do you expect one? Roberts: No
What was the £2/10/ for? Nurse Woolley told me I would be under expense.
But you do not take charity, do you? No, I took it that it was money already paid to Nurse Woolley by my wife
Did you pay for the cab? No
To Mr. MeKenna, Roberts said he had no personal knowledge that his wife went to Nurse Woolley on June 5. His wife was not anxious to have a child.
Further cross-examined, Roberts said his wife had made an effort to bring about a miscarriage on an earlier occasion. Questioned regarding the recent events, he said that before June 5 his wife had obtained from the Mainland certain goods designed to produce an abortion. She had taken pills a few days before June 5.
Referring to a conversation Roberts had had with Nurse Woolley after his wife’s death, His Honor asked: “Did you wish to hide anything from the doctor?”
Roberts: That was according to what my wife told me.
Detective-Inspector R. W. Fleming also gave evidence.
The Court adjourned.

Source: Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), Thursday 15 August 1940, page 12

ALLEGATIONS DENIED
Nurse Faces Trial On Charge Of Manslaughter

“I have never attended or treated Mrs.Roberts in any way apart from the attention I gave her at Sandy Bay on June 6 in the presence of her relatives,”concluded a statement read on behalf of Jennie Shaw, otherwise known as Nurse Woolley, at her trial in the Criminal Court at Hobart yesterday on a charge of having unlawfully killed Daphne Faith Roberts (23), married, of Main Rd., Lower Sandy Bay, on June 5. Evidence was concluded, and after addresses to the jury the hearing was adjourned until 10.30 a.m. today.
Mr. Justice Hutchins presided. Mr. H. J. Solomon (Tinning, Propsting, Masters, and Solomon) with Mr. J. B. Hutchins, appeared for the Crown, and Mr. N. E. McKenna (Ogilvie, McKenna and Co.) for Nurse Woolley.
Lily Roberts, mother of Daphne Roberts, said her daughter was away from home for three hours on the morning of June 5. She appeared well that day, but looked ill the following morning. Nurse Woolley was called, and after examining her said everything would be all right. Witness told the nurse that her daughter had stated that she had been informed by Nurse Woolley that nothing would happen for about three days. Accused stated she had said it would be at any time within three days. Before witness’ daughter left for hospital Nurse Woolley said she would give some of the money back. She stated also that she would get out of the cab on the way, as “it would not do for them to see her.”
To Mr. McKenna: Nurse Woolley did not say to deceased while witness was in the room, “You have not seen me before, have you, Mrs. Roberts?”
A statement read on behalf of accused set out that under the name of Nurse Woolley she conducted a registered maternity hospital at 39 Burnett St. The first time she saw Daphne Roberts was at Roberts’ home on June 6. Witness did not leave her room until noon on June 5, and when she went downstairs Sister Wilson informed her that Mrs. Roberts had called. Mrs. Roberts, she was informed, had stated that she was pregnant, and had been endeavouring to bring about a miscarriage. Nurse Woolley received from Sister Wilson £3/3/, which deceased was said to have left. She was called to the Roberts’ home on June 6, and was told, in reply to a question, that deceased had been ill all night.
Mrs. Roberts sen. told Nurse Woolley her daughter had informed her that she had been to accused’s place the previous day, the statement continued. “I said to the patient, ‘You have not seen me before, have you, Mrs. Roberts?’ The patient shook her head.” Accused advised that deceased be taken to hospital, and offered to take her in the cab in which she had made the visit.
The £2/10/ she gave deceased’s husband on the way to hospital represented portion of the £3/3/ Sister Wilson had given her. The reasons accused left the cab at the corner of Davey and Elizabeth streets were that she had to call at the post office, and because she did not want deceased to be driven through the main streets, as she was not fully clothed.
Sister Elsie Emily Wilson said she was employed by Nurse Woolley. Deceased called at the hospital on June 5 and asked to see Nurse Woolley. She was nervous and looked ill. Nurse Woolley was resting, and she did not disturb her. Mrs. Roberts said she had been endeavouring to bring about a certain event. She said she particularly wanted Nurse Woolley to see her, and added: “I have the money to pay her, and might as well leave some of it while I’m here.” Witness advised her to seek medical advice, and told her Nurse Woolley would not be able to accept her. Mrs. Roberts left £3/3/ on the table, as she was going out the door, and witness gave it to Nurse Woolley.
To Mr. Solomon: She issued receipts when payments were made, but did not give one to Mrs. Roberts, as she knew the money would be returned seeing that she had not received treatment.

Source: Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), Friday 16 August 1940, page 4

ADDENDA

Birth, death and bereavement notices for Alfred Hope

Marriage of Alfred Hope’s Parents 1883

William Hope and Frances Stops
Stops, Frances Louisa
Record Type: Marriages
Gender: Female
Age: 22
Spouse: Hope, William
Gender: Male
Age:21
Date of marriage: 28 Mar 1883
Registered: Hobart
Registration year: 1883
Record ID: NAME_INDEXES:893874
Resource: RGD37/1/42 no 513

Birth of Alfred George Stops HOPE 1897

Birth of Alfred Hope
Hope, Alfred George Stops
Record Type: Births
Gender: Male
Father: Hope, William
Mother: Stops, Frances Louisa, [Queen St. North Hobart]
Date of birth: 26 Jan 1897
Registered: Hobart
Registration year: 1897
Record ID: NAME_INDEXES:1101813
Resource: RGD33/1/21/ no 1120
https://stors.tas.gov.au/NI/1101813

Family Notices of Alfred Hope’s death

Sudden premature death of Alf Hope
Family Notices – The Mercury Saturday 10 April 1943 – Page 9

TRANSCRIPT

HOPE – On April 8, 1943 (suddenly), at Royal Hobart Hospital, Alfred George, dearly beloved husband of Muriel Grace Hope, of 11 Jordan Hill Rd., and loved and loving father of Atholie and Beverley, and beloved only son of William and the late Frances Hope, of 28 Newdegate St., aged 46 years. At rest.

Source: Family Notices – The Mercury Saturday 10 April 1943 – Page 9

The wife and daughters of the late Alfred Hope, Hobart, wish to sincerely thank their many friends and relatives for letters, cards, telegrams, floral tributes, and personal expressions of sympathy in their recent sad bereavement. Will all please accept this as a personal, expression of deepest gratitude.
Mr William Hope and daughters desire to thank all kind relatives and numerous friends for all tokens of sympathy received during their recent bereavement.

Source: Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954), Saturday 8 May 1943, page 9

More Obituaries

Death of Alfred Hope
The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954) Sat 10 Apr 1943 Page 3 DAY BY DAY

TRANSCRIPT

Mr Alfred Hope
Mr Alfred George Hope, of 11 Jordan Hill Rd., Hobart, proprietor of the only landau operating in Hobart, died suddenly as the Royal Hobart Hospital on Thursday. Mr Hope, who was aged 46 years, was the last cabman in Hobart. He drove his cab for 30 years, and it had been driven by his father. Mr. Hope was the only son of Mr William Hope, 28 Newdegate St.. Hobart, and the late Mrs Hope. He is survived by his wife and two daughters, The funeral will take place today.

Source; The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954) Sat 10 Apr 1943 Page 3 DAY BY DAY

Death of genial Mr Hope
The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954) Sat 10 Apr 1943 Page 3 DAY BY DAY

TRANSCRIPT

The “Cabby” Passes
WITH the death of Mr Alfred Hope, whose landau was the sole survivor of Hobart’s once large fleet of horse conveyances, Hobart has lost its last “cabby.” Since 1938, when the Broughton family decided to replace their cabs with motor taxi-cabs, Mr Hope had held his place alone on the old cab rank near Franklin Square. Relic of the days when there were 100 landaus in Hobart, when organised trotting races for cab horses were a popular pastime, the old landau has been a novel sight amid the motor traffic of the city. Genial Mr Hope was well known to citizens as well as to the many tourists who enjoyed the novelty of seeing Hobart from a horse-drawn cab, and many friends will regret his passing.

Source: The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 – 1954) Sat 10 Apr 1943 Page 3 DAY BY DAY

Albert Nevin 1914

Subject: Youngest son of Thomas and Elizabeth Nevin, Albert E. Nevin, Hobart
Location and date: Newdegate St. 1914
Details: black and white photograph. Unattributed. 
Verso inscribed: “”To Miss E. Davis, From Mr. A. Nevin, 1914”
Copyright © KLW NFC Imprint & Private Collection 2009 ARR.

Albert Edward Nevin (1888-1955) was the seventh child, fifth son and last born child to photographer Thomas J. Nevin (1842-1923) and his wife Elizabeth Rachel Nevin nee Day (1847-1914). He was born at 236 Elizabeth Street, Hobart. He married Emily Maud Davis (1891-1971) on the 5th March, 1917, at Launceston, Tasmania. He died in 1955, aged 67 yrs. Emily was three years younger but died sixteen years later, in 1971, aged 80 yrs.

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