One of the last portraits by Alfred Bock in Hobart 1865

This photograph of a teenage girl with bare shoulders and ringlets may be one of the very last taken by Alfred Bock in Hobart Tasmania before his departure in 1865. The design of the studio stamp on the verso was altered only minimally by his younger partner Thomas J. Nevin who bought the lease of the studio, shop, the glass house and darkroom, the stock of negatives, camera equipment, backdrops and furniture etc at auction on August 2, 1865. Thomas Nevin continued to use the stamp’s design for his commercial studio portraiture for another decade, although he used at least six other designs for various formats and clients, including the Royal Arms insignia for his contracts and commission with the Colonial government. … More One of the last portraits by Alfred Bock in Hobart 1865

Preview: The Liam Peters Collection

Seven (7) previously unpublished photographs by Thomas J. Nevin or pertaining to Thomas J. Nevin’s photography from the late 1860s to the mid 1870s were scanned and submitted to this weblog by private collector Liam Peters in December 2010. The brief descriptions below of each item will be expanded eventually for each photograph (use search box in sidebar). … More Preview: The Liam Peters Collection

T. J. Nevin’s big tabletop stereograph viewer

Although this image is faint – it is a scan of a print pasted into the scrapbook of his son George Ernest Nevin (1880-1957) which is held by Thomas and Elizabeth Nevin’s descendants in the Shelverton family – it shows clearly enough that George’s father, photographer Thomas J. Nevin, was rather fond of his big box table top stereograph viewer. It provided clientele with a ready amusement, a novel experience of 3D. The Victorian fascination with this “advanced” photography is quite understandable. Viewing a static stereograph, three images can be seen, not just one: the central image appears in deep perspective, with the image split into halves on either side. A double lens stereograph viewer of this size could hold a large number of stereograph cards; turning the wooden handle changed the card being viewed, providing a motion picture effect. In Nevin’s self-portrait – not a selfie in the strict sense, of course, taken probably by his younger brother Jack Nevin – a frame holder on top is propped up. In the two portraits below, the holder is flat. An earlier portrait of Thomas Nevin, taken ca. 1868, shows him wearing white gloves, posing with a smaller portable stereoscopic viewer, similar in size to a stereoscope camera. … More T. J. Nevin’s big tabletop stereograph viewer

The table with the griffin-shaped legs

CHARLES A. WOOLLEY megalethosscope ALFRED BOCK advertisements THOMAS J. NEVIN studio furniture Charles A. Woolley placed an advertisement in the Tasmanian Mercury, February 11th, 1871 for his wonderful “magalethoscope” [sic]. Charles Woolley’s ad in the Mercury February 11, 1871 This is a misprint, perhaps by the newspaper. The megalethoscope was an apparatus for viewing photographs … More The table with the griffin-shaped legs

Thomas Nevin’s studio decor and tints ca. 1871

This full length portrait in carte-de-visite format is of an unidentified woman. As the same carpet appears in the Nevin-Day wedding photograph dated July 1871, this photo can be dated ca. 1869-72. The verso bears Thomas Nevin’s everyday business stamp which was an elaboration of the stamp used by his mentor, and previous owner of … More Thomas Nevin’s studio decor and tints ca. 1871

Hugh Munro Hull & the wallhanging

The talented Hugh Munro Hull (1818-1882) was a lithographer, artist, historian, author, and photographer. He was also the Clerk of the House and Librarian to the Tasmanian Parliament. This full-length photograph of Hugh Munro Hull in official dress was taken by Alfred Bock or Thomas Nevin at their studio, The City Photographic Establishment, 140 Elizabeth-street Hobart between 1863 and 1868 where one of their backdrops featured a square tiled terrace pattern rising in perspective to a painted balustrade overlooking a vista of disappearing river and mountains. … More Hugh Munro Hull & the wallhanging